Trim and Tidy

What do you do when a staff member’s father-in-law is coming to Menokin to haul kayaks down to the waterfront? Ask him to bring his weed eater and trim around the picnic table and launch area, of course!

Last Thursday, Richmond County resident Luke French came to the rescue of the Intrepid Ladies of Menokin when he agreed to stack one volunteer opportunity on top of another. It is friends like these that help us keep our grounds trim and tidy.

Luke French trims the waterfront.
Luke French comes to the rescue.

 

 

You can now see the picnic table. Thanks, Luke!
You can now see the picnic table. Thanks, Luke!

And they do it for free! Which is a good thing when you are a non-profit raising every dollar that is spent.

Speaking of good deeds and generosity, the Menokin grounds will get another face lift soon through a partnership and volunteer project with the Friends of the Rappahannock and Dominion Energizing Communities, which will result in the addition of benches along the river trail, picnic tables and benches at the education shelter, with a generous donation from Wood Preservers.

The volunteers will also provide assistance with grounds maintenance and restoration of some of the facilities used by Menokin for our programs.

 

“Intern”pretations: Stephen Barr

Stephen surmounted the vast store of raw video and audio footage at Menokin and created a  wonderful collection of video shorts covering topics from Oral Histories to Glass Project Team interviews. Not only did he do what the staff has never had time to accomplish, he did it very well!

Stephen Barr
Menokin Foundation Internship
July, 2016

Stephen Barr
Stephen Barr

As a student of early American history, the opportunity to work on the house of a signer of the Declaration of Independence was exciting – even if most of that work would be done remotely.  Fortunately, it has proven to be an educational experience despite the distance.  From documenting artifacts to video editing, my work with the Menokin Foundation this summer has provided me with new and practical experiences in historical preservation, archaeology, and digital history.

Before I started work for Menokin at the end of June, Alice French, the outreach and education coordinator, shared a number of readings from the Center for Digital Storytelling.  The readings helped to clarify their expectations.  I had not done any video creation or any work for a historical foundation.  The Digital Storytelling Cookbook from CDS was a useful guide for the purposes and processes for digital storytelling.  Much of the text is focused on telling personal stories, but the focus on using objects in videos, finding important moments, and keeping the audience’s attention were directly applicable to the work I would be doing.  It also had step-by-step directions for creating storyboards, writing scripts, and using particular video editing software.  Alice also shared an article from Edutopia: “How to Use Digital Storytelling in your Classroom” by Jennifer New.  As a teacher, I was particularly interested in this article as it applied to both my internship work for Menokin and my full-time teaching.  In her article, New gives a number of good tips for creating videos for educational purposes and encouraging students to create their own videos.  The readings gave me a frame of reference when beginning the video editing work for the summer.

The main purpose of my internship is to help the Menokin Foundation produce digital history content for their website and museum.  The content will be use to demonstrate the progress being made in restoring the site and highlight the many activities and opportunities available through the foundation.  To start, it was encouraged that I practice my video editing skills by creating a promotional video for their annual summer camp.  There were a number of pictures and video clips from the previous year’s camp, and I was use them to highlight the activities children would participate in this year.  It took a couple days to create the final video, mostly because I was still learning to use the WeVideo software that Menokin is using.  The process involved sorting through dozens of photos to find appropriate ones for use, editing down video clips, creating a storyboard, then editing it all together into a single video with captions and a musical track.  Since that first one, I have become much more adept at creating short video montages of what is happening at Menokin.  I have created a couple of videos on 18th century carpentry practices and techniques using recordings of classes Menokin has provided.  I also edited a number of recordings of archeologists examining artifacts into short clips that will be used in longer compilation videos.

Menokin also wanted transcriptions of a variety of audio and video files in their database – transcriptions which I later found very useful when making compilation videos.  Some of the more straightforward videos, such as the carpentry lessons, were fairly easy to transcribe.  There were also interviews with people who had family connections to Menokin, and these were much more difficult.  The interviews, which were audio only, were very informal; they were more similar to conversations than the lectures I had already transcribed.  I found it challenging to keep track of who was talking and what they were saying.  I wanted to record as much accuracy as possible, since the transcriptions would be used by the Foundation in other projects after I had left.  The transcriptions were time consuming, but also very interesting.  One interview was done when a visitor to Menokin shared that their great-uncle once owned the house, and she would visit the site as a child in the 1930’s.  Another, much longer, interview was with two sisters in their 90’s who may have been descended from slaves who worked at Menokin.  They had a great deal to share about growing up in the Northern Neck throughout the 20th century.  The interviews told a lot about the history of Menokin and the surrounding area.  Once I had the transcriptions, it became very easy to find some of the best quotes to use in videos promoting the history of Menokin.

On my first trip down to Menokin since I began the internship work, the was to gather recordings and pictures of the Archaeologists at work on the site and collect older pictures off the Menokin server that were too large to send by e-mail.  It was also an opportunity to get to know more of the staff at Menokin and experience their day-to-day work.

The most fascinating part of the trip was getting to watch and interview the archaeologists.  I do not have any experience with archaeology, but I could tell that they were experts who loved what they did.  The day I was down there, a small group of four contracted archaeologists were carefully sifting through the rubble of a collapsed corner of the house.  They were both cleaning the site for reconstruction, and looking for artifacts.  The lead archaeologist, Chris, was very personable and allowed me to interview him about his work.  He explained the process of sifting through dirt to find artifacts, described his history with the site, and showed me the glass bottles, buttons, and nails that they were preparing for cleaning and cataloging.  I also interviewed Hank Handler with Oak Grove Construction, who has been doing reconstruction planning and work for Menokin for several years.  He was very excited to discuss the techniques being used to stabilize the structure at Menokin  – techniques pioneered by the English Heritage Society that were just being introduced to the US.  As much as I wanted to, I was not dressed to jump in the rubble and join them (honestly, it did seem exciting), but I was able to get some great pictures and audio recordings to use in promotional and educational videos for Menokin.

The rest of the day was a chance to familiarize myself with the practical matters of a historical institution like Menokin.  The staff is small, and they seem to work together on both day-to-day and long-term tasks.  This particular day, they were hosting a genealogy course for the local community college; I was happy to help out when I was not searching their server for pictures and files.  I also met with the acting director, Leslie Rennolds, to discuss my work and upcoming projects.  The visit was a great opportunity to re-familiarize myself with the site and gather material for future videos.

I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Menokin.  The experience so far has been incredibly educational.  As I work into the second half of the summer, I plan to use the techniques and information I have gathered to create more digital content for the foundation.  Right now, I am planning videos about the archaeology and stabilization work I witnessed Monday.  There are also more recordings and material from past events at Menokin to examine and turn into media that can be presented to the public – connecting the public to the history.  I am excited to continue the work.

Bibliography

Lambert, Joe.  The Digital Storytelling Cookbook.  Berkeley:  The Center for Digital          Storytelling, 2010.

New, Jennifer. “How to Use Digital Storytelling in Your Classroom.”  Edutopia:  2005.              http://www.edutopia.org/digital-storytelling-classroom

“Intern”pretations: Eliza Carr-Schmidt

The Menokin staff would like to thank Eliza, who took on the daunting task of sifting through boxes and boxes of artifacts extracted from archaeological digs at Menokin over the last 13 years, and photographing them for use in an upcoming exhibit. Her work is exceptional and we are so pleased with the final images!
Eliza is a rising sophomore at Christ Church School.

 


I first became interested in Menokin when I visited on a field trip a couple years ago. I was not only intrigued by the history of the house and the people that lived there but also the plan about the ‘Glass House’. It was something that I had never seen before. I liked the

Collection of buttons excavated at Menokin during an archaeological dig in 2009.
Collection of buttons excavated at Menokin in 2009. Photo by Eliza Carr-Schmidt.

idea that you could see what the house would have looked like back then while at the same time seeing what it looks like today. It’s awesome that you can see the structure of the house, foundation, and the inside of the walls, but it’s also cool that it shows what’s happened over time.

Damper key discovered during the 2016 excavation. Photo by Eliza Carr-Schmidt
Damper key discovered during the 2016 excavation. Photo by Eliza Carr-Schmidt

Before my internship, I didn’t realize that they had carried out so many digs and found so many cool artifacts. It was a pleasure to get to go through all the different things that have been found through the years. I hadn’t realized that other people had lived at the house after Francis and Rebecca. The artifacts were like a timeline that shows what went on and how things changed through the years. I not only learned more about the history of the house and the people that lived there, but I enjoyed the photography aspect as well. It was not all what I was expecting, but I’m very glad it’s what I ended up doing!

It was also fun to learn about what goes on in the background of historic places like Menokin. I had no idea the amount of time and effort that went into something like this. I think it’s really amazing that Menokin seems like it’s all put together by the community. It’s an amazing place that has a bunch of really cool people that obviously care a lot about what they are doing. It was so much fun getting to help out there and meet all the incredible people that make Menokin possible!

Rappahannock River National Wildlife Refuge’s Youth Conservation Corp at Menokin

Guest Blogger: Jarred Johnson | USFWS Summer Intern

 

Group in doorwayThe Rappahannock River National Wildlife Refuge’s Youth Conservation Corp had a chance to experience a great opportunity to engage and learn a crucial part to Virginia’s history.

The crew was able to receive extensive background knowledge about the Menokin site and how it came to be. The crew Hard Hatsexperienced a full tour of the house as we walked around the building, down into the cellar, and up on to the main floor!

Kayaking along Cat Point Creek was another highlight, as we paddled we saw Bald Eagles, Wood ducks, and much more wildlife.

KayakingAs for the afternoon, attentions were set on a professor from William Mary who discuses information about the stones that were used to build the house. Another successful Environmental Education Day for the YCC crew.

Thank you again to everyone at the Menokin site.

__________________________________________________________

The Menokin Foundation would like to thank USFWS, the Youth Conservation Corps, these summer interns, and most of all Jarred for sending us this post. He’s not in any of the pictures because he was taking them. Here’s one of him from Dr. Bailey’s geology lecture.

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Get Quacking. Register today for Junior Duck Stamp Camp.

 Join the Menokin Foundation, Rappahannock Wildlife Refuge Friends, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Westmoreland State Park for Junior Duck Stamp Camp! This year’s camp is scheduled for August 1, 2, 4, and 5th from 1:00 until 5:00 each day.

What is Junior Duck Stamp Camp?

While investigating the natural habitats of waterfowl in the Rappahannock River Valley watershed, campers will learn to document what they see and discover with notes and sketchbooks. By the end of the week, campers will have a greater understanding of the waterfowl and their habitats. They will also have had the opportunity to experiment with a variety of drawing techniques to prepare them to enter the Junior Duck Stamp Camp Contest in March 2017.

Junior Duck Stamp Camp guides will take campers kayaking on Wilna Pond, Cat Point Creek, and the Potomac River. Students will learn “How to Birdwatch and Duck Identification 101” and how to draw birds in various forms and landscapes. The final artwork created by the students will tour the region and images will be shared with area media publications.

The Junior Duck Stamp Camp program is for 5th to 8th graders, ages 10-14. The cost to attend is $50 per child. Several full scholarships are available thanks to the generosity of the Rappahannock Wildlife Refuge Friends.  Transportation is available from a central meeting site each day.

For more information or to register, please contact Alice French at the Menokin Foundation: afrench@menokin.org or (804) 333-1776. Or download a Registration Brochure.

Hurry! Time is running out, so register today!

Don’t Forget Why We’re Celebrating This Weekend

Thanks, Frank.

IMG_2345
Menokin Road view of a summer sky

O beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!

Wheat field at Menokin
Wheat field at Menokin

O beautiful for pilgrim feet,
Whose stern impassion’d stress
A thoroughfare for freedom beat
Across the wilderness!
America! America! God mend thine ev’ry flaw,
Confirm thy soul in self-control,
Thy liberty in law!

Silent wilderness
Silent wilderness

O beautiful for heroes proved In liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved,
And mercy more than life!
America! America! May God thy gold refine
Till all success be nobleness,
And ev’ry gain divine!

The grave of Francis Lightfoot Lee
The grave of Francis Lightfoot Lee

O Beautiful for patriot dream
That sees beyond the years
Thine alabaster cities gleam,
Undimmed by human tears!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood
From sea to shining sea!

Smashing Glass Tour!

BY: ALICE FRENCH

On June 13th, Mrs. Smith’s 11th Grade Advanced Placement History  class from Richmond County High School visited Menokin as guinea pigs to test out a new tour style being developed here: a Smashing Glass Tour!

The students participated in a dynamic tour which integrated the use of smart phone technology, social media, and physical activity.  They learned about Francis Lightfoot Lee and the history of Menokin, architecture and building trades.

For an activity, we practiced some of the things we discussed about architecture by first working in teams to build structures with blocks.  And then…oh yes, body building- making architectural forms out of humans.

Of course, after all the fun, we still had time to take a selfie with Frank.

17_selfie with Lee


The Menokin Visitor’s Center has new Hours of Operation, which now include scheduled times for guided tours.

VISITOR’S CENTER

OPEN 
Wed | Thurs | Fri:  10 am – 4 pm
Sat: May – September: 12 pm – 4 pm

CLOSED
Sun | Mon | Tues

PAID TOUR HOURS
Wed: 11 am and 2 pm
Thurs: 2 pm and 6 pm
Fri: 11 am and 2 pm

(Paid tours available by appointment; some restrictions apply.)

 

Email Alice to schedule a special Smashing Glass Tour.

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