Google, Google, what do you see? I see Menokin in 360.

Earlier in the year, while attending a VAM (Virginia Association of Museums) conference in Alexandria, I happened to attend a session led by two folks from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities Encyclopedia Virginia (EV) Project.

Matthew Gibson, Director of Digital Initiatives and Editor of EV, and Peter Hedlund, Programmer for EV, were helping non-profits identify free, reasonably priced and accessible digital resources to use in their communications platform. Toward the end of the session, they presented their recent affiliation with Google Street View. It seems that they had received training and licensing from Google to compile virtual tours of historic venues and they were asking for interesting places to visit and shoot.

After bull-dozing my way through the crowd that gathered around them after their session, I managed to wave a business card within eye shot and said “You might be interested in Menokin for a Google Street View venue.” Bazinga. It was as if the fates had planned the whole thing.

“Menokin!” Peter shouted to Matthew. (Or maybe Matthew shouted to Peter.) “She’s from Menokin!”

I felt fairly confident that they were interested.

They were, and in late spring they journeyed to our little corner of the Northern Neck to capture the footage. I got to learn the Google Dance, which involves constantly moving in a circle to keep out of the view of the camera. We canvassed the entire property including the ruin, the trails, the Visitors Center and the Conservation Barn.

CaptureThe result is a comprehensive 360 degree look at each floor of the house, as well as a view of the landing at Cat Point Creek, a tour of the Historic Woodwork Collection at the Visitors Center, and a trip inside the Conservation Barn to view the structural timbers and building stones that were excavated from the site.

Anyone who Googles “Menokin” will see a link to the virtual tour. So if you’re an armchair tourist and would like to see Menokin from the comfort of your home, here’s your chance. Or if you’re planning a visit (and we hope you are), take a look around before you get here.

Story Telling With A Camera

IMG_0129Menokin played host to a full house of local teachers on July 31st who were participating in the Rappahannock Community College (RCC) Teacher History Tour recertification program.

Menokin’s newly formed partnership with the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) allowed us to develop a program for this Teacher Tour called Story Telling With A Camera.

Photographer, and adjunct VMFA professor, Stacy Evans led the discussion and instruction. The program included a step-by-step series of discussions and presentations about the process of Story Telling With A Camera, including a brief history of Menokin; a photography presentation; how to plan a sequence for
a story; and ideas for a final presentation.

During this shared experience, participants learned about processing and presentation tools like laptops, printer output, and bookmaking materials.
The goal of the exercise was to help participants learn to listen – to themselves and others – and help draw out personal narratives that are interesting and meaningful. Skills that most certainly translate to the classroom.

Here is a (very) brief video of my presentation from the day.

The Cat’s Meow

We have always known that Menokin is the cat’s meow. But now there is proof!

Through the generosity of a Menokin Trustee, these replicas of Menokin (in the style of the rehabilitated house), are now available for purchase.

House

These replicas are produced by Cat’s Meow, and feature a representation of the facade of the Glass House based on the rendering of architect Jorge Silvetti of Machado and Silvetti Associates.

The Menokin Replicas are $25 each plus $5 shipping. Click here to order online.

They are also available at the Menokin Visitor’s Center.

All proceeds from this sale of this collectible will directly benefit the Menokin Foundation.