“Intern”pretations – Episode 2: Bri

bri basile interned at menokin for six weeks this summer. today is her last day! she was raised in the suburbs of philadelphia, and is a rising sophomore at PENN STATE, pursuing a degree in architectural engineering. 

 

Reflection No. 1

Bri“It is the middle of June and I am in the middle of my travel back in time for the summer. Well not really, but life has definitely been a little different for the past couple of weeks. I am what you could call a true Yankee. I was born and raised in the suburbs of Allentown, Pennsylvania and now study at Penn State. Yes, I have traveled to many different places, but I have never lived outside of Pennsylvania and am now in Warsaw, Virginia.

Warsaw is a small town surrounded by countless beautiful farms and old, 18th century houses, which is exactly what brought me here. For the summer I am interning at the wonderful Menokin Foundation, which brings my interests of history, architecture, and engineering all together. Their plan is to build a glass house around the colonial house, to help stabilize and showcase what the house originally looked like. I find it fascinating how they plan to combine the modern glass structure with the old brick house. I know from looking at the models and plans that it will be truly and piece of artwork once it is completed.

If there is anything I learned from my first few days was that I will have to come back during and after construction of the final project. “

Reflection No. 2

“When Alice asked me if I wanted to go kayaking with couple of people from the National Park Service I expected to kayak for a half hour to forty-five minutes not for four and a half hours. Even though it was a really long time and I had sore arms for about a week, it was completely worth it!

Cat Point Creek is really a place that has not been touched by humans and you can truly become one with nature. Even on the slightly cloudy day I watched eagles and other birds fly across the sky and fish jumping out of the water. Not only did the animals fascinate me, but also the bright flowering plants all along the sides.

I could definitely spend weeks just paddling along and taking pictures of everything I saw and would encourage you to do the same as long as you promised not to destroy the true treasure it is.”

Bri has been learning how to use and edit footage from a Go Pro camera. This little video was shot on her marathon kayaking excursion on Cat Point Creek.

 

INTERNPRETATIONS ARE BLOG POSTS AUTHORED BY OUR INTERNS. THIS GLIMPSE OF MENOKIN AND ITS PLACE IN THE LIVES OF THESE COLLEGE STUDENTS IS OUR ATTEMPT TO REPRESENT AN ALTERNATIVE POINT OF VIEW Of A MENOKIN EXPERIENCE. THE ONLY INSTRUCTIONS ARE “WRITE ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE HERE.” WE HOPE TO FEATURE AN INTERNPRETATION EACH WEEK.

“Intern”pretations – Episode 1: Emily

emily lyth has been an intern at menokin since april 2014. she lives in richmond county with her family and is currently pursuing her bachelor’s degree from drexel university’s online degree program.

“I started visiting the trails at Menokin back in April. As a new intern, I felt it was important to educate myself about The Menokin Foundation. To me, that meant going beyond simply learning about Francis Lightfoot Lee and the history of the Menokin house; I wanted to explore the land and the property that are such an intrinsic part of Menokin’s story.

So when the weather got a little warmer, I laced up my hiking shoes, charged my iPod, and spent most of my Saturday traveling the beautiful paths through the woods and along Cat Point Creek. Though I hadn’t anticipated it, that was the beginning of a new weekend tradition for me ─ one that has become a great source of relaxation in my life.

The following weekend, I added my camera, some homework, and a book to my backpack and spent the afternoon taking pictures of nature and the wildlife, catching up on homework, and reading.

Whether it’s just to walk and mess around with my camera while I listen to music or to sit at the picnic table by the creek and do homework and read, spending time at Menokin is now something I look forward to after a long or stressful week; the whole property offers a peaceful solitude that can’t be found anywhere else.

Over the last couple of months, I’ve learned that visiting Menokin with friends is a fun way to spend the day enjoying nature, and visiting alone is a great way to relax, de-stress, and clear my mind. Menokin has become like my own little sanctuary ─­­ the place I escape to when I need time alone or need to unwind.

Since I started interning at Menokin, I have felt that I’m part of an organization and experience that is truly special, and I think the property and trails are a great reflection of that feeling.”

Internpretations are blog posts authored by our interns. this glimpse of menokin and its place in the lives of these college students is our attempt to represent an alternative point of view ofa menokin experience. the only instructions are “write about your experience here.” we hope to feature an internpretation each week.

PHOTOS © EMILY LYTH, 2014

Oh, Madeira. The Nectar of the Founding Fathers.

We know there were plenty of bottles of Madeira inventoried from the wine cellars of our early founders. In the inventory of Frank Lee at Menokin, he had a “pipe” of Madeira, plus 14 dozen ditto bottles, 3 dozen bottles of Port, a dozen bottles of Old Spirit, 13 bottles of Malm (Madeira wine), 2 dozen bottles of Cyder, 20 gallons of old Rum, and 20 gallons of Whiskey.

On her blog, WWJD* – What Would Julia Drink?, Julia Pearson and Bartholomew Broadbent share an educational, entertaining and tasty conversation about the history, traditions and qualities of Madeira. Thanks, Julia and Bartholomew. Now we know that there was always a good party in the Menokin household.

Watch the video: Episode no.2 – Bartholomew Broadbent discusses Madeira

Image courtesy of Broadbent
Image courtesy of Broadbent

 

 

Bug of the Week – Eight-spotted Forester Moth

This Eight-spotted Forester Moth (Alypia octomaculata) was feasting on the flowering winterberry bush outside my office window. Those puffy orange knees caught my eye and I had to go out to investigate.

The first few photo attempts were fruitless, as the moth flitted away as soon as I got close enough. Persistence paid off, however, and this flashy fellow got used to me and let me snap away.

First google search of “black and white moth with orange legs” hit the jackpot with enough information to make you a virtual  Eight-spotted Forester Moth Expert.

Here are the tidbits that I found most interesting:

  • The EsFM is a smallish (1 ½ inch wingspread), flashy, day-flying moth that is often mistaken for a butterfly when it’s nectaring on flowers. While not knobbed like a butterfly’s, its antennae are slim (simple), not feathery. It has black wings with two cream-colored spots on each forewing and two white spots on each hind wing (= 8). Its body and legs are also black, accented by yellow “epaulets” called tegulae on the thorax at the base of each wing and by startling tufts of orange hairs at the tops of its first and second pairs of legs. One theory is that the orange tufts resemble the packed pollen baskets of a bee.
  • Their body and wings are black, there are two yellow spots on each forewing and two white spots on each hindwing….and of course those gorgeous orange tufts on their legs, that seriously look like stockings. The eight distinctive spots on their wings is where their species name comes from….octomaculata literally translates into 8-spotted.
  • The moth flies from April to June in one generation in the north. In the south it has a second generation, which flies in August.

A few other flying friends were at the party. This lightening bug seemed to think that the winterberry blossoms tasted just fine.

Menokin’s Partnership With VMFA Brings New Programs And Learning Opportunities To The Area

The Menokin Foundation is pleased to announce that is has become a statewide community partner of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The partnership program is open to independent, organized, and permanently established non-profit institutions in Virginia that maintain open membership, have a mission that is educational or aesthetic in purpose, and provide open access to programs and exhibitions provided by VMFA.

The Menokin Foundation is thrilled to be able to bring VMFA programs, speakers, and exhibits to the residents of the Northern Neck,” stated Alice French, Education and Outreach Coordinator for Menokin. “Along with many other new programs being hosted at Menokin this year, the VMFA programs will kick off this summer with a very special speaker, Jeffrey Allison.

Allison, photography historian and Manager of Statewide Programs and Exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, is also the Paul Mellon Collection Educator and Manager for VMFA and a professional photographer.

In his lecture, Chasing the Illusive Image: The Origins, Identification, and Care of Antique Photographs, Allison will discuss the history of photography and how to identify and care for the various types of old photographs in your own collection. He will also share information on how to determine the year a photograph was made and share examples of historic photographic processes.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own photographs to share with Mr. Allison and other attendees. You’ll leave this interactive session with a sound basis on how to identify photographs using information provided in handouts, reference websites and book titles used by Allison in his work with the VMFA.

There is a $10 per person fee to attend and registration is strongly encouraged. You may purchase tickets in advance at www.menokin.org/events or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/menokin or you may pay at the door. This program will take place on Thursday, July 10, 2014 at 6:00 pm at the Menokin Visitor’s Center.

Additional programs scheduled in 2014 include:

Digital Story Telling with a Camera, taught by artist and educator, Stacey Evans – July 20, 2014. Participants will illustrate a fictional narrative using photographic imagery. This workshop is part of the teacher recertification series that is offered through Rappahannock Community College. Contact Harriet Dawson at RCC to enroll. 804-758-6755 or HDAWSON@rappahannock.edu.
Digital Story Telling with a Camera, taught by artist and educator, Stacey Evans – July 20, 2014. Participants will illustrate a fictional narrative using photographic imagery. This workshop is part of the teacher recertification series that is offered through Rappahannock Community College. Contact Harriet Dawson at RCC to enroll. 804-758-6755 or HDAWSON@rappahannock.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 Environmental Art Installation with artist and psychotherapist, James Yates – September 20, 2014.  Yates will work with local high school students to create an onsite installation that heightens awareness and appreciation of the environment.  

Environmental Art Installation with artist and psychotherapist, James Yates – September 20, 2014.  Yates will work with local high school students to create an onsite installation that heightens awareness and appreciation of the environment.

Menokin plans to utilize this partnership with the VMFA to develop programs that will bring a level of fine art and exhibits to the communities of the Northern Neck and surrounding counties,” stated Executive Director, Sarah Pope. “The Menokin house will be an exhibit itself, as well as an exhibit space. Historic, modern and interpretive installations will provide arts, education and inspiration to visitors and artists alike.

For more information on these and other programs, please visit us online at www.menokin.org, or in person at 4037 Menokin Road, Warsaw, VA 22572

July 4th Commemoration in Northern Neck Corn Field

IMG_0791
Burnt House Field

Even in Virginia’s Northern Neck, Burnt House Field Cemetery is an out-of-the-way place to honor a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The cemetery at Hague in Westmoreland County is surrounded by a brick wall and 100 acres of corn. Richard Henry Lee (1732-1794) is buried here with his parents and grandparents.

Lee was more than just a signer. In the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, Lee introduced the resolution calling for independence from Great Britain that led to the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

His brother Francis Lightfoot Lee (1734-1797) also signed it. Ten years earlier, they had burned an effigy of the Tax Man at the Westmoreland courthouse and helped organize other opposition to the hated Stamp Act.

Sponsored by the Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Society and Cople Parish, the commemoration at the Lee cemetery will begin at 8:30 a.m. It will feature a living-history interpretation of Francis Lightfoot Lee and his wife, Rebecca Tayloe Lee, visiting Richard Henry Lee’s grave. (Francis Lightfoot Lee is buried in the Tayloe Cemetery at Mt. Airy near Warsaw.)

The grave of Francis Lee at Mount Airy.
The grave of Francis Lee at Mount Airy.

The observance will then move 5 miles to Yeocomico Episcopal Church. Built in 1706, it was the home church of the Lee family. Richard Henry Lee and his father Thomas Lee both served on the vestry. The service at the church will include prayers and the singing of patriotic hymns and the national anthem.

For additional information, contact Steve Walker, 804-472-3291, yeocomshan@yahoo.com

DIRECTIONS

The wicket door at Cople Parish.
The wicket door at Yeocomico Episcopal Church

CEMETERY: From State Rt. 202 (Cople Highway) at Hague, take Rt. 612 (Coles Point Road) about one-half mile to Rt. 675 (Mt. Pleasant Road). The cemetery is about a mile at the end of the gravel road.

CHURCH: From cemetery, turn left on Rt. 612 (Coles Point Road). Go one mile and turn right on Rt. 606 (Tucker Hill Road). Go three miles and turn right on Rt. 606 (Old Yeocomico Road). The church will be on the right.

Chasing the Illusive Image

Chasing the Illusive Image: The Origins, Identification, and Care of Antique Photographs
Jeffrey W. Allison, VMFA

July 10, 2014 at 6:00 pm at the Menokin Visitor’s Center.
Cost is $10 per person.
Light refreshments will be provided.

This exciting opportunity being offered by Menokin, in conjunction with the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, will interest history buffs and photographers alike, as well as those folks interested in genealogy.

In this lecture, Chasing the Illusive Image: The Origins, Identification, and Care of Antique PhotographsJeffrey W. Allison, photography historian and Manager of Statewide Programs and Exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, will discuss the history of photography and how to identify and care for the various types of old photographs in your own collection. He will also share information on how to determine the year a photograph was made and share examples of historic photographic processes.

Participants will view examples of early photograph, including a wonderful Daguerreotype from 1844, and learn the differences between that and later Ambrotypes and Tintypes.

"Rockland" - home of Menokin's Assistant Director, Leslie Rennolds.

“Rockland” –  I will be submitting this picture of my husband’s ancestral home, where we now live. Can’t wait to find out what year it was taken to see if we can figure out who’s in the photograph.

Bring your own photographs to share with Mr. Allison and other attendees. You’ll leave this interactive session with a sound basis on how to identify photographs using information provided in handouts, reference websites and book titles used by Allison in his work with the VMFA.

This includes tips for proper care and storage of various kinds of antique photographs and negatives, as well as the storage and preservation of today’s digital images, which are in greater danger of being lost than any of the 100-year-old images people are likely to own.

The Menokin Foundation is a Statewide Community Partner of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The collaboration allows Menokin to offer cultural and educational programs provided by the VMFA to our local community.